EthicaDB •   Publication hypertextuelle et multi-versions de l'Ethique de Spinoza

propositio 69

Pars 4, prop 69
Latin | Appuhn - fr | Stern - de | Peri - it | Suchtelen - nl | Peña - es | Pautrat - fr | Misrahi - fr  |  haut ^

The virtue of a free man is seen to be as great, when it declines dangers, as when it overcomes them.

Hominis liberi virtus aeque magna cernitur in declinandis quam in superandis periculis.

Hominis liberi virtus aeque magna cernitur in declinandis quam in superandis periculis.

La vertu d'un homme libre se montre aussi grande quand il évite les dangers que quand il en triomphe. (Appuhn - fr)

Die Tugend des freien Menschen zeigt sich ebenso groß in Vermeidung als in Überwindung von Gefahren. (Stern - de)

La virtù di un Uomo libero si manifesta egualmente grande tanto nel sottrarsi ai pericoli quanto nel superarli. (Peri - it)

De deugd van den vrijen mensch blijkt evenzeer uit het vermijden als in het overwinnen van gevaren. (Suchtelen - nl)

La virtud del hombre libre se muestra tan grande cuando evita los peligros como cuando los vence. (Peña - es)

La vertu de l’homme libre se montre aussi grande à décliner les dangers qu’à en venir à bout. (Pautrat - fr)

La vertu de l’homme libre s’avère aussi grande à éviter les périls qu’à les surmonter. (Misrahi - fr)

demonstratio par 4, prop 7  |  4, prop 5  |  4, prop 3  |  3, prop 59, sc 

Latin | Appuhn - fr | Stern - de | Peri - it | Suchtelen - nl | Peña - es | Misrahi - fr

4, prop 69, demo  - Emotion can only be checked or removed by an emotion contrary to itself, and possessing more power in restraining emotion (IV. vii.). But blind daring and fear are emotions, which can be conceived as equally great (IV. v. and iii.): hence, no less virtue or firmness is required in checking daring than in checking fear (III. lix. note); in other words (Def. of the Emotions, xl. and xli.), the free man shows as much virtue, when he declines dangers, as when he strives to overcome them. Q.E.D.

4, prop 69, demo  - Affectus coerceri nec tolli potest nisi affectu contrario et fortiore affectu coercendo (per propositionem 7 hujus). At caeca audacia et metus affectus sunt qui aeque magni possunt concipi (per propositiones 5 et 3 hujus). Ergo aeque magna animi virtus seu fortitudo (hujus definitionem vide in scholio propositionis 59 partis III) requiritur ad audaciam quam ad metum coercendum hoc est (per definitiones 40 et 41 affectuum) homo liber eadem animi virtute pericula declinat qua eadem superare tentat. Q.E.D.

4, prop 69, demo  - Une affection ne peut être réduite ni ôtée que par une affection contraire et plus forte que l'affection à réduire (Prop. 7). Or, l'Audace aveugle et la Crainte sont des affections que l'on peut concevoir également grandes (Prop. 5 et 3). Une vertu, ou force d'âme (voir la Déf. dans le Scolie de la Prop. 59, p. III), aussi grande est donc requise pour réduire l'Audace que pour réduire la Crainte ; c'est-à-dire (Déf. 40 et 41 des Aff.) qu'un homme libre évite les périls par la même vertu qui fait qu'il tente d'en triompher. C.Q.F.D. (Appuhn - fr)

4, prop 69, demo  - Ein Affekt kann nicht anders eingeschränkt oder aufgehoben werden als durch einen andern Ihm entgegengesetzten und stärkeren Affekt (nach Lehrsatz 7 dieses Teils). Aber Tollkühnheit und Furcht sind Affekte, welche als gleich groß begriffen werden können (nach den Lehrsätzen 5 und 3 dieses Teils). Folglich ist eine gleich große geistige Tugend oder Stärke (s. deren Definition in der Anmerkung zu Lehrsatz 59; Teil 3) erforderlich, um die Kühnheit wie um die Furcht einzuschränken. Das heißt (nach den Definitionen der Affekte, Ziffer XL und XLI), der freie Mensch vermeidet mit derselben geistigen Tugend die Gefahren, mit welcher er sie zu überwinden sucht. - W.z.b.w. (Stern - de)

4, prop 69, demo  - Un sentimento non può essere coartato od eliminato se non da un sentimento contrario al sentimento considerato, e più forte di esso. Ora, un'Audacia (talvolta sconsiderata) e un Timore sono sentimenti che possono concepirsi di eguale grandezza, ossia intensità: e dunque per riuscire a controllare l'Audacia e per riuscire a controllare il Timore occorre una virtù, o fortezza d'animo egualmente grande; vale a dire che un umano libero si sottrae ai pericoli con la stessa virtù, o fortezza d'animo, con la quale egli tenta in altre circostanze di superarli. (P. III, Chiarim. d. Prop. 59; Def. dei Sentim., 40 e 41; P. IV, Prop. 3, 5, 7). (Peri - it)

4, prop 69, demo  - Een aandoening kan alleen worden getemperd of opgeheven door een tegengestelde aandoening, welke sterker is (vlg. St. VII v.d. D.). Blinde Doldriestheid en Vrees echter zijn aandoeningen welke men zich even sterk kan denken (vlg. St. V en III v.d. D.). Derhalve zal er een even groote zielskracht of kloekheid (welker Definitie men nasla in Opmerking St. LIX D. III) vereischt worden om Vermetelheid als om Vrees te temperen, d.w.z. (vlg. Definities XL en XLI der Aand.) de vrije mensch zal krachtens dezelfde zielskracht gevaren ontwijken als waarmede hij ze tracht te overwinnen. H.t.b.w. (Suchtelen - nl)

4, prop 69, demo  - Un afecto no puede ser aminorado ni suprimido más que por un afecto contrario, y más fuerte que el que se trata de reprimir (por la Proposición 7 de esta Parte). Ahora bien, la audacia ciega y el miedo son afectos que pueden concebirse como igualmente grandes (por las Proposiciones 5 y 3 de esta Parte). Por consiguiente, se requiere una virtud o fortaleza del ánimo (ver su Definición en el Escolio de la Proposición 59 de la Parte III) igualmente grande para reprimir la audacia que para reprimir el miedo; es decir (por las Definiciones 40 y 41 de los afectos), un hombre libre evita los peligros mediante una virtud del ánimo igual a aquella con que intenta vencerlos. Q.E.D. (Peña - es)

4, prop 69, demo  - Un affect ne peut être réprimé ou supprimé que par un affect contraire, et plus fort que l’affect à réprimer (par la Proposition 7). Or l’Audace aveugle et la Crainte sont des affects que l’on peut concevoir comme ayant la même force (par les Propositions 5 et 3). Par conséquent, une égale vertu ou force d’âme (voir leurs Définitions au Scolie de la Proposition 59, Partie III) est requise pour réprimer l’Audace et pour réprimer la Crainte, c’est-à-dire que (par les Définitions 40 et 41 des Affects) l’homme libre évite les périls par la même vertu grâce à laquelle il tente de les surmonter. C.Q.F.D. (Misrahi - fr)

4, prop 7 - An emotion can only be controlled or destroyed by another emotion contrary thereto, and with more power for controlling emotion.

4, prop 5 - The power and increase of every passion, and its persistence in existing are not defined by the power, whereby we ourselves endeavour to persist in existing, but by the power of an external cause compared with our own.

4, prop 3 - The force whereby a man persists in existing is limited, and is infinitely surpassed by the power of external causes.

3, prop 59, sc  - All actions following from emotion, which are attributable to the mind in virtue of its understanding, I set down to strength of character (fortitudo), which I divide into courage (animositas) and highmindedness (generositas). By courage I mean the desire whereby every man strives to preserve his own being in accordance solely with the dictates of reason. By highmindedness I mean the desire whereby every man endeavours, solely under the dictates of reason, to aid other men and to unite them to himself in friendship. Those actions, therefore, which have regard solely to the good of the agent I set down to courage, those which aim at the good of others I set down to highmindedness. Thus temperance, sobriety, and presence of mind in danger, &c., are varieties of courage; courtesy, mercy, &c., are varieties of highmindedness.
I think I have thus explained, and displayed through their primary causes the principal emotions and vacillations of spirit, which arise from the combination of the three primary emotions, to wit, desire, pleasure, and pain. It is evident from what I have said, that we are in many ways driven about by external causes, and that like waves of the sea driven by contrary winds we toss to and fro unwitting of the issue and of our fate. But I have said, that I have only set forth the chief conflicting emotions, not all that might be given. For, by proceeding in the same way as above, we can easily show that love is united to repentance, scorn, shame, &c. I think everyone will agree from what has been said, that the emotions may be compounded one with another in so many ways, and so many variations may arise therefrom, as to exceed all possibility of computation. However, for my purpose, it is enough to have enumerated the most important; to reckon up the rest which I have omitted would be more curious than profitable. It remains to remark concerning love, that it very often happens that while we are enjoying a thing which we longed for, the body, from the act of enjoyment, acquires a new disposition, whereby it is determined in another way, other images of things are aroused in it, and the mind begins to conceive and desire something fresh. For example, when we conceive something which generally delights us with its flavour, we desire to enjoy, that is, to eat it. But whilst we are thus enjoying it, the stomach is filled and the body is otherwise disposed. If, therefore, when the body is thus otherwise disposed, the image of the food which is present be stimulated, and consequently the endeavour or desire to eat it be stimulated also, the new disposition of the body will feel repugnance to the desire or attempt, and consequently the presence of the food which we formerly longed for will become odious. This revulsion of feeling is called satiety or weariness. For the rest, I have neglected the outward modifications of the body observable in emotions, such, for instance, as trembling, pallor, sobbing, laughter, &c., for these are attributable to the body only, without any reference to the mind. Lastly, the definitions of the emotions require to be supplemented in a few points; I will therefore repeat them, interpolating such observations as I think should here and there be added.

corollarium

Latin | Appuhn - fr | Stern - de | Peri - it | Suchtelen - nl | Peña - es | Misrahi - fr

4, prop 69, cor  - The free man is as courageous in timely retreat as in combat; or, a free man shows equal courage or presence of mind, whether he elect to give battle or to retreat.

4, prop 69, cor  - Homini igitur libero aeque magnae animositati fuga in tempore ac pugna ducitur sive homo liber eadem animositate seu animi praesentia qua certamen fugam eligit.

4, prop 69, cor  - Dans un homme libre donc la fuite opportune et le combat témoignent d'une égale Fermeté d'âme ; autrement dit, l'homme libre choisit la fuite avec la même Fermeté d'âme, ou présence d'esprit, que le combat. (Appuhn - fr)

4, prop 69, cor  - Dem freien Menschen wird daher die Flucht zur rechten Zeit als ebenso große Seelenstärke (Tapferkeit, Mut) angerechnet wie der Kampf. Mit andern Worten: der freie Mensch erwählt mit derselben Seelenstärke oder Geistesgegenwart die Flucht wie den Kampf. (Stern - de)

4, prop 69, cor  - Un umano libero, pertanto, sarà da riconoscersi dotato di una Determinazione (o Intrepidezza) egualmente grande sia che egli si ritiri, quando è il momento, sia che combatta: ossia l'umano libero sceglie la fuga con la stessa Determinazione, o Presenza d'animo, con cui sceglie il combattimento. (Peri - it)

4, prop 69, cor  - Vluchten te juister tijd moet den vrijen mensch als een even groot bewijs van moed worden aangerekend als strijden, ofwel de vrije mensch kiest met even grooten moed of tegenwoordigheid van geest den strijd als de vlucht. (Suchtelen - nl)

4, prop 69, cor  - En un hombre libre, pues, una huida a tiempo revela igual firmeza que la lucha; o sea, que el hombre libre elige la huida con la misma firmeza o presencia de ánimo que el combate. (Peña - es)

4, prop 69, cor  - Ainsi, chez l’homme libre, une égale Fermeté d’âme se manifeste dans la fuite opportune et dans le combat : c’est-à-dire que l’homme libre choisit la fuite avec la même Fermeté ou présence d’esprit que le combat. (Misrahi - fr)

scholium par 3, prop 59, sc 

Latin | Appuhn - fr | Stern - de | Peri - it | Suchtelen - nl | Peña - es | Misrahi - fr

4, prop 69, sc  - What courage (animositas) is, and what I mean thereby, I explained in (III. lix. note). By danger I mean everything, which can give rise to any evil, such as pain, hatred, discord, &c.

4, prop 69, sc  - Quid animositas sit vel quid per ipsam intelligam, in scholio propositionis 59 partis III explicui. Per periculum autem id omne intelligo quod potest esse causa alicujus mali nempe tristitiae, odii, discordiae etc.

4, prop 69, sc  - J'ai expliqué ce qu'est la Fermeté d'âme, ou ce que j'entends par là, dans le Scolie de la Proposition 59, partie III. Quant au péril, j'entends par là tout ce qui peut être cause de quelque mal, tel que Tristesse, Haine, Discorde, etc. (Appuhn - fr)

4, prop 69, sc  - Was Seelenstärke ist oder was ich darunter verstehe, habe ich in der Anmerkung zu Lehrsatz 59, Teil 3, erklärt. Unter Gefahr aber verstehe ich alles dasjenige, was Ursache irgendeines Übels sein kann, wie: der Unlust, des Hasses, der Zwietracht usw. (Stern - de)

4, prop 69, sc  - Che cosa sia la Determinazione, o che cosa io intenda con tale termine, è spiegato nel Chiarim. della Prop. 59 della III Parte. Per Pericolo poi intendo ogni cosa che possa essere causa di un male: appunto di Tristezza, di Odio, di Discordia, eccetera. (Peri - it)

4, prop 69, sc  - Wat moed is, of wat ik daaronder versta, heb ik in de Opmerking bij Stelling LIX van Deel III uiteen gezet. Onder gevaar echter versta ik al wat oorzaak van eenig kwaad kan zijn, zooals Droefheid, Haat, Tweedracht enz. (Suchtelen - nl)

4, prop 69, sc  - He explicado en el Escolio de la Proposición 59 de la Parte III qué es la firmeza, o qué entiendo por ella. Por "peligro" entiendo todo lo que puede ser causa de algún mal: de tristeza, de odio, de discordia, etc. (Peña - es)

4, prop 69, sc  - J’ai expliqué, au Scolie de la Proposition 59 de la Partie III, ce qu’est la Fermeté d’âme, ou ce que j’entends par là. Quant au péril, il désigne pour moi tout ce qui peut être cause de quelque mal, tel que la Tristesse, la Haine, la Discorde, etc. C.Q.F.D. (Misrahi - fr)

3, prop 59, sc  - All actions following from emotion, which are attributable to the mind in virtue of its understanding, I set down to strength of character (fortitudo), which I divide into courage (animositas) and highmindedness (generositas). By courage I mean the desire whereby every man strives to preserve his own being in accordance solely with the dictates of reason. By highmindedness I mean the desire whereby every man endeavours, solely under the dictates of reason, to aid other men and to unite them to himself in friendship. Those actions, therefore, which have regard solely to the good of the agent I set down to courage, those which aim at the good of others I set down to highmindedness. Thus temperance, sobriety, and presence of mind in danger, &c., are varieties of courage; courtesy, mercy, &c., are varieties of highmindedness.
I think I have thus explained, and displayed through their primary causes the principal emotions and vacillations of spirit, which arise from the combination of the three primary emotions, to wit, desire, pleasure, and pain. It is evident from what I have said, that we are in many ways driven about by external causes, and that like waves of the sea driven by contrary winds we toss to and fro unwitting of the issue and of our fate. But I have said, that I have only set forth the chief conflicting emotions, not all that might be given. For, by proceeding in the same way as above, we can easily show that love is united to repentance, scorn, shame, &c. I think everyone will agree from what has been said, that the emotions may be compounded one with another in so many ways, and so many variations may arise therefrom, as to exceed all possibility of computation. However, for my purpose, it is enough to have enumerated the most important; to reckon up the rest which I have omitted would be more curious than profitable. It remains to remark concerning love, that it very often happens that while we are enjoying a thing which we longed for, the body, from the act of enjoyment, acquires a new disposition, whereby it is determined in another way, other images of things are aroused in it, and the mind begins to conceive and desire something fresh. For example, when we conceive something which generally delights us with its flavour, we desire to enjoy, that is, to eat it. But whilst we are thus enjoying it, the stomach is filled and the body is otherwise disposed. If, therefore, when the body is thus otherwise disposed, the image of the food which is present be stimulated, and consequently the endeavour or desire to eat it be stimulated also, the new disposition of the body will feel repugnance to the desire or attempt, and consequently the presence of the food which we formerly longed for will become odious. This revulsion of feeling is called satiety or weariness. For the rest, I have neglected the outward modifications of the body observable in emotions, such, for instance, as trembling, pallor, sobbing, laughter, &c., for these are attributable to the body only, without any reference to the mind. Lastly, the definitions of the emotions require to be supplemented in a few points; I will therefore repeat them, interpolating such observations as I think should here and there be added.

0.0358